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Introduction

The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has reversed a California district court's ruling that the remastering of a sound recording effectively created a new version of that recording.

Highlights

  • The case was brought by a number of US record companies against the radio broadcaster CBS because the broadcaster had claimed that it was only broadcasting digitized versions of pre-1972 sound recordings, which it claimed were covered by federal copyright law.

Features and Benefits

  • Discusses the court's decision to reverse a ruling that the remastering of a sound recording created a new version of that recording.
  • Explains the grounds for the case reversal and why the appeal court decided that the district court decision was incorrect.

Key questions answered

  • Why did the appeal court rule that the district court had erred in the CBS remastering pre-1972 recordings case?
  • What happens to the legal case now?

Table of contents

Ovum view

  • Summary
  • The most famous date in US copyright law
  • The CBS remastered summary judgment
  • Appeal court reverses the district court decision
  • Abuse of discretion by excluding expert testimony

Appendix

  • Author